Winnipeg Jewish Review  
Site Search:
Home  |  Archives  |  Contact Us
 
Features Local Israel Next Generation Arts/Op-Eds Editorial/Letters Links Obituary/In Memoriam


 
Parsha Bishalach - People Believe What They Want to Believe

Rabbi Ben Zion Shafier - The Shmuz Director Jan 30, 2012

And Moshe stretched out his hand over the sea, and HASHEM moved the sea with a strong eastern wind all the night, and He turned the sea to damp land and the water split.” — Shemos 14:21
Egypt, the country that bragged that no slave had ever escaped its land, stood by helplessly as the Chosen Nation triumphantly left. Yet even at this moment, Pharaoh sent spies along to follow them. After three days, his agents reported back that the Jews had veered off course. Pharaoh called out to his people, “Let us reclaim that which is ours,” and he led them in pursuit.
When the Mitzrim arrived on the scene, the Jews were camped out against the Yam Suf. At that moment, the cloud of fire that led the Jews through the desert moved to the back of the camp and stopped the Egyptians from advancing. That entire night, both camps stood in their places, separated by the Clouds of Glory.
The Ramban explains that during the night, an eastern wind began blowing. This was the wind that split the sea. At first, it made small indentations in the sea, but as the night wore on, the wind became stronger, and those small indentations grew in size and depth until the sea itself was split into twelve distinct pathways – ready for each tribe to cross in its own channel.
The Ramban explains that HASHEM split the sea with the wind “so that it would appear as if the wind split the sea into partitions.” Even though the wind can’t possibly split the sea, much less split it into twelve separate partitions, nevertheless, because of their great desire to harm the Jews, the Mitzrim “pegged it on a natural cause.” It was just the wind, nothing more.
This Ramban is very difficult to understand. How could the Mitzrim possibly pin the splitting of the sea on the wind? They were intelligent, thinking people. They, as everyone else, clearly understood that this couldn’t be a natural occurrence. How is it possible that they accepted this sham – that the wind split the sea?
How could the Mitzrim possibly believe the wind split the sea?
Understanding free will
The answer to this question is predicated upon understanding the concept of free will. Free will doesn’t mean the theoretical ability to do good or bad. It is the practical ability where either side is possible. When a person can just as easily turn to the bad as to the good, then it is his decision to choose.
As an illustration, do you have free will to put your hand in a fire? In theory, you do. You could do it. But you never would. It is damaging. It is foolish. So, while in theory you have free will to do it, on a practical level, you don’t.
Creating man
Chazal (our sages) tell us that HASHEM created man to give him the opportunity to shape himself into what he would be for eternity. That molding of the person is accomplished by choosing what is good and proper and avoiding that which is wrong and evil. By making these choices, man forms himself.
To create an even playing field, HASHEM took the sechel – that pure, brilliant part of me – and inserted it into a body filled with drives, passions, and hungers. Now the two parts of me are integrated. I don’t want only what is good and proper and noble. I also desire and hunger for many other things. My choice of doing only good is no longer so simple.
However, if HASHEM created man only out of these two parts – the sechel and the guf – the purpose of creation would never have been met. The wisdom of man is so great that it would be almost impossible for him to sin. Since every sin damages me and every mitzvah makes me into a bigger, better person, my natural intelligence wouldn’t allow me to sin, no matter how tempted I might be. I would clearly recognize it as damaging to me. Much like putting my hand into a fire, in theory I would have free will to do it, but on a practical level, I wouldn’t.
Imagination – its role and function
Therefore, HASHEM added one more component to the human: imagination. Imagination is the creative ability to form a mental picture and sense it so vividly, so graphically; it is as if it is real. Ask anyone who has ever cried while reading a novel whether imagination isn’t a powerful force.
Now armed with this force, man can create fanciful worlds at his will and actually believe them. If man wishes to turn to evil, he can create rationales to make these ways sound noble and proper – at least enough to fool himself. If he wishes he can do what is right, or if he wishes, he can turn to wickedness, and even his brilliant intellect won’t prevent him. With imagination, he is capable of creating entire philosophies to explain how the behavior he desires is righteous, correct, and appropriate. Now man has free will.
People believe what they want to believe
The result of this is that people don’t believe that which is factual, proven and true; they believe what they want to believe. And, one of the greatest manifestations of this is the Egyptiansfollowing the Jews to their death. Despite living through the makkos, despite seeing the sea split into twelve sections, they didn’t believe it was a miracle. They attributed it to the wind because that is what they wanted to believe.
 
<<Previous Article       Next Article >>
Subscribe to the Winnipeg Jewish Review
  • Royal Bank
  • Jewish Federation of Winnipeg
  • Canadian Friends of Hebrew University
  • Jewish Federation of Winnipeg
  • Commercial Pool
  • Derksen Plumbing
  • Booke and Partners
  • Coughlin Insurance
  • CHW
  • Joyce Rykiss
  • Sobey's
  • Jack and Debbie Lipkin
  • Asper Family
  • Winter's Collision Repair
  • Daniel Friedman and Rob Dalgliesh
  • Dimensions Insurance
  • Commercial Pool
  • Superlite
  • Blair Worb
  • MCW Consultants Ltd.
  • Marks Family
  • K. Sleva Contracting
  • Bridges for Peace
  • Munroe Pharmacy
  • TD Canada Trust
  • GTP
  • Imperial Soap
  • Daien Denture Clinic
  • Nick's Inn
  • Rady JCC
  • Booke and Partners
  • Carol and Barry McArton
  • Shirley and Bob Freedman
  • Shinewald Family
  • Josef Ryan
  • Roseman Corp.
  • Thorvaldson Care
  • Cavalier Candies
  • Ambassador Mechanical
  • HUB
  • CDN Visa
  • Laufman Reprographics
  • Maric Homes
  • Myers LLP
  • Artista Homes
  • Western Scrap Metal
  • Southwynn Homes
  • Tradesman Mechanical
  • Taverna Rodos
  • Ixtapa Travel
  • Global Philathropic Canada
  • Protexia
  • Munroe Dental Centre
  • Broadway Law Group
  • Magen David Adom
  • Bridges for Peace
  • Cascade Financial Group Inc.
  • Superlite
  • Chisick Family
  • Myrna Driedger
  • Jim Gauthier
  • Orthodox Union
  • Accurate Lawn & Garden
  • Dr. Gary Levine
  • Fetching Style
  • Ronald B. Zimmerman
  • Chochy's
  • Aziza Family
  • James Bezan
  • Candice Bergen
  • Holiday Inn Express
  • Peerless Garments
  • John Orlikow
  • Lofchick Family
  • Safeway
  • Allan Davies
  • West Kildonan Auto Service
  • Kristina's Fine Greek Cuisine
  • Erickson Motors
  • Shoppers Drug Mart
  • Grant Kurian Trucking
  • Nikos
  • Sarel Canada
  • Santa Lucia Pizza
  • Boys Town
  • Center for Near East Policy Research
  • Roofco Winnipeg Roofing
  • Center for Near East Policy Research
  • Nachum Bedein
Rhonda Spivak, Editor

Publisher: Spivak's Jewish Review Ltd.


Opinions expressed in letters to the editor or articles by contributing writers are not necessarily endorsed by Winnipeg Jewish Review.