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Abu Allah and Tzipi Livni at the King David Hotel in Jerusaelm in August 2010
Photo by Rhonda Spivak.


Tzipi Livni, head of Kadima, says that it is in Israel's interest not to wait to bring about a two -state solution. But any agreement made with the PA couldn't be implemented in Gaza if Hamas was still in power.
Photo by Rhonda Spivak.


Professor Tamar Herman of the Israel Democracy Institiute. Both Livni and Qurei were "insincere" in suggesting that the issue is one "leadership" not "public opinion."
Photo by Rhonda Spivak.


King David Hotel, Jerusalem

 
THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN PICKED UP BY 10 OTHER SITES: LIVNI AND ABU ALLA TOGETHER: HE FAILS TO SAY THE WORDS "TWO STATES"

By Rhonda Spivak, July 13, 2010

SPECIAL REPORT AND COMMENT

*This article has been picked up by the following 10 websites ( links are provided at the end of the article): www.deskbar.google.com (Google News), www.examiner.comwww.israelforum.com, www.israelbehindthenews.com, www.jewpi.comwww.jrants.com , www.blog.wogo.com, www.onejewishstate.blogspot, www.nightghost, www.calevbenyafuneh.blogspot.com

 JERUSALEM - Opposition leader Tzipi Livni , head of Israel’s Kadima  party, shared a podium in English with  former Palestinian Prime Minister  Ahmed Qurei [Abu Alla] of Fatah at Jerusalem’s King David Hotel on July 11th, 2010.

This was the first time the two had met since they engaged in substantive talks on a weekly basis when Livni was Foreign Minister in Ehud Olmert’s government after the Annapolis conference.

Throughout her speech Livni  repeatedly referred to the need for a “two state” solution and used the words “two states for two people” and similar  phraseology , while Qurei, on the other hand, did not utter the words “ two states” or “two state solution” even once. In addition Livni spoke of the need to “divide” the land that is between the Mediterranean sea and the Jordan River at several points in her remarks, but  Qurei did not use similar terminology of “dividing” the land.

Livni and Qurei’s speeches were part of a conference titled “The Israeli-Palestinian Proximity Talks: Lessons from Past Negotiations,” which was organized by Hebrew University’s Harry S. Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace in conjunction with the  German based Konrad Adenaur Stiftung group.

While Qurei did refer to the Oslo Accords  as “the most important historical breakthrough in the history  of the conflict,” and also  refereed to his negotiations with Livni after Annapolis as “serious negotiations”, once can not help but wonder why he chose not to utter the words “two-states” even once?

Is it possible he did not do so, because on the Palestinian street, more people are talking about “a one state solution,”  or   waiting to obtain all of ‘historic Palestine’, such that Fatah determined that was no point for it to waste any efforts on uttering “two states”  when Livni is not  even in  power.

Regarding the resumption of negotiations, Qurei did not soften the official Fatah stance. He said “I don’t think it is possible for PA leadership to go to direct negotiations “without the stopping of settlements.”  He referred to Netanyahu , saying “you know that he continues the settlements,” despite the  apparent settlement freeze.

Qurei also said that Netanyahu “is taking unilateral actions in Jerusalem”, regarding home demolitions and other matters, such as construction of roads. “The Jerusalem situation is a  time bomb,” he said.
Notwithstanding the rivalry between Hamas and Fatah , it is interesting to note  that Qurei  made an effort to  support the rights of  members of  Hamas’s legislative council, to remain in Jerusalem. (is that a sign that his radar is more attuned with Hamas than Israel? )

“No one can accept that Israel has released representatives of Hamas Legislative council [from prison since 2006] and then is  making them leave Jerusalem,” Qurei said.

Qurei also said  that  he doesn’t see any “signs of encouragement”, and that “We [Palestinians] want a process to solve the problems, not a process to manage the problems.”

He also complained that Netanyahu had deviated from the course taken by the government in which Livni had served. “If there is no stable policy, there will be no process,” he said.

Qurei said that the lack of progress was not a “problem of public opinion” but a problem of  leaders,” such as “their tactics and personal motives”( although presumably he was directing those remarks at Netanyahu and other leading members of his coalition, and not  PA President Abbas).

Qurei ended his comments by saying that he personally believes that “people on both sides will support any just agreement that will be reached [emphasis added].” Here again rather than saying “two state  solution,” as Livni did throughout her speech, Qurei used the much more nebulous phrase, “just solution.”

Livni and Qurei shook hands after he finished his remarks.

During her own talk, Livni mocked the Netanyahu government for not getting direct peace talks off the ground. She said the Annapolis talks, which took place while she was foreign minister, “didn’t fail, didn’t end, it was stopped” by elections.

“Less than two years ago, we met at this hotel a few times a week,” she said, referring to her meetings with Qurei.

“The press wasn’t here because it was not news. It was just the ongoing relations between the Israelis and Palestinians.”

Livni said of Qurei. “He was a tough negotiator if I may say. I was also I think a tough negotiator.

Livni stressed that to make progress in the process, “It’s not about public opinion. It’s about decision making [by] leaders. I believe that the role of a leader is to make a change in the long run for their people.”

She said that negotiating requires “trust”, that “the other side wants to end this conflict on the basis of two states.”

“Now there are no talks about how to end the conflict,” she said

Livni added that “I know” that an agreement providing for a two state solution “will be supported by the vast majority of Israelis, and “I hope” this will be supported by the vast majority of Palestinians [emphasis added].”
  
Livni warned that ‘time works against the vision of  two states,” and that it was not in Israel’s interest to “wait until someone forces us,” or “puts completely different maps before us.” She rejected the notion that Israel “should wait for a  better partner.”

“ The idea of  two-nation states represents the best interest of Israel. It’s about our future and existence of Israel and of the Jewish people.”

Livni referred to the framework that she and Qurei had agreed on in their negotiations.

“We decided we needed to engage on all core issues. We decided that negotiations should be discrete. We decided that nothing would be agreed on until everything was agreed on and we decided to negotiate on all issues simultaneously.”

Livni  made it clear that even if an agreement were reached with  the Palestinian Authority in the West  Bank, the agreement would not be implemented with Hamas in power in Gaza.”.

“If we had an agreement, we won’t give the keys to Hamas”

But  having a two-state so

 
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Rhonda Spivak, Editor

Publisher: Spivak's Jewish Review Ltd.


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