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7 Tips For Leading A Happy Life In Old Age

September 1, 2022

As we age, everything changes - our bodies, our minds, and the world around us. Change is inevitable at any age, and while the changes brought about in our later years can seem more drastic, they’re certainly no barrier to living a full, happy life.

 

In this article, we’ll take a look at seven ways you can flourish in your golden years. These tips are geared toward seniors, but as you’ll soon see, they apply to absolutely everyone. 

Stay connected

Relationships come and go. People move. People pass away. As we age, it can get hard to stay connected to others.

 

Socializing is vital to your well-being, so it’s absolutely essential that you stay connected to others as you age. There are many ways you can maintain and enhance your social life, including:

 

  • Living close to friends and family - this may involve aging-in-place

  • Volunteering

  • Joining hobby groups

  • Calling friends and family daily

  • Adopting a pet

  • Using technology like social media to stay in touch

 

That’s not an exhaustive list by any means, but you get the idea - find ways to make and maintain connections, and you’ll get the most out of your golden years. 

Keep learning

Learning is vital at all ages - it keeps the brain healthy and stops you from getting bored. There’s no end to the different ways you can learn in modern society: You’re on this page, so it’s likely you already know how to surf the Web. Look up videos on hobbies that interest you!

 

Of course, books have been the mainstay of learning for untold ages, and that remains true today. Pick up a book on a new topic, or delve a little bit deeper into one of your favourite topics. Books can cause eye strain but never fear - you can always enjoy an audiobook.

 

Theoretical knowledge is all well and good, but practical knowledge can really help you absorb it. Try some of the hobbies you’ve read about. Talk to friends and family about the subjects you’re learning. By applying what you learn, you’re more likely to retain it - and you’ll get quite a bit of enjoyment out of the process! 

Take care of your body

Your mind and body aren’t disconnected - when the body feels good, the mind is more likely to feel good, and vice versa. We can’t fit an exhaustive list of all the ways you can take care of your body here, but here are a few pointers:

 

  • Be mindful of what you consume. Alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs can take a serious toll on your body.

  • Prescription drugs can have side effects, too. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist to understand what side effects your prescription drugs may have.

  • Exercise regularly. There are exercises available for people with all ranges of mobility - even light exercise like yoga or walking can be immensely helpful.

  • Mind what you eat. Avoid eating excessively, and incorporate healthy foods like olive oil into your diet. Talk to a dietician to learn about the foods and diet that might best serve your needs.

  • Take time for self-care. Get plenty of rest, and take advantage of professional services like massage therapy to improve your well-being. 

Exercise your mind

There are plenty of different ways to exercise your mind outside of learning. Meditation has been shown to boost well-being in a variety of different ways. Curiosity is another key to brain health - if you don’t know what something is or why you feel a certain way, stay curious about it. Positive curiosity can lead to incredible growth. 

Focus on the good

We know that focusing on the positive, uplifting parts of life can be difficult. By following the tips here, staying positive should become a bit easier. It can, however, be hard to resolve internal conflicts that stop you from acknowledging the good things in life. Talk therapy can work wonders - and so can talking to a friend or family member. 

Enjoy the outdoors

You may know that it’s common to suffer from sleep issues later in life. There are a wide variety of reasons for this, but one of them is that seniors tend to get a lot less daylight. Less daylight can mean an interruption to your circadian rhythm, which governs when you sleep (and, to a degree, the quality of your sleep).

 

That’s just one of the many reasons to enjoy the outdoors. We recommend going outside for at least an hour a day. If you’re worried that mobility issues could prevent you from getting outside, consider purchasing mobility equipment to make it easier.  

Start today!

Our final tip is that you should follow the tips we’ve laid out above, no matter what your age is. Whether you’re 35 or 75, all of these tips can help you lead a happier, healthier life. 

 
 
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Rhonda Spivak, Editor

Publisher: Spivak's Jewish Review Ltd.


Opinions expressed in letters to the editor or articles by contributing writers are not necessarily endorsed by Winnipeg Jewish Review.