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Classical homeopathy from a Jerusalem expert

By Adiel Caspi,Jerusalem, March 10, 2011

Anxiety has its source in a place of our being from which rise the majority of our strongest emotions, like anger, violent emotional reactions, and even  physical diseases.  FEAR is the name of the place. The origin of most fears is linked to ancient archetypal fear patterns in human beings, linked primarily to survival. Those fears are brought again to life by an emotional trauma, which generally occured in childhood, but whose trace has not disappeared: it  has remained hidden in a small corner of  our subconscious, awaiting for a reminiscence of that frightening event.

Since our thought is unable to see the link existing between the two events, this fear enters in our mind into  the obscure category of the "unknown", and our first reaction, in front of an unknown danger, is of course one of flight and escape. The life of an anxious person is an endless series of escapes (from social events, from desired contacts, from responsibilities, and more).

The problem is complicated by the fact that those escapes are sometimes induced by our immune system itself which manages to keep at bay every foreign element that might lead to a loss of control, like a panic attack, considered as a danger  for our health. With all of its precision, the intelligence of the immune system is still unable to distinguish between a real and a fictitious danger. It has to react swiftly. Beyond the mobilization of the body, which adopts defense mechanisms, the impulse to escape is often its only immediate weapon  for fighting those fears. And though the ‘danger’ exists only in our imagination, we again flee from it. It is a human and normal reaction, linked to  old reflexes of survival. 

Not only do those reactions of flight not solve our problem, but they actually exacerbate it. They are the basis of anxiety.

This is why resisting anxiety is not the solution. Resistance may take the form of flight, of drug addictions, of anxiolytic remedies... Non-resistance is one of the best ways to dissolve the trace of unknown dangers when one knows that those fears have no real basis. To make easier that attitude, however, and to avoid the somatisation of stress, one has to insert it into a therapeutic method whose basis is also non-resistance to nature. I mean classical homeopathy, which has replaced all the existing "ANTI" medications by remedies which do not suppress symptoms, but deal with them in a much more natural manner.

More on the subject of non-resistance, and on possibilities of online treatment by a Jerusalem classical homeopath, in www.sereniteonline.com and in www.efrathomeo.com

 
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Publisher: Spivak's Jewish Review Ltd.


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